Ethnic Concilation

Reject “Racial Reconciliation”?
I have two major issues with the term Racial Reconciliation.

  1. It assumes there’s more than one race on earth – I personally disagree and side with anthropologists & scientists who classify humans as being of one race with many ethnicities
  2. It assumes at some point in American history conciliation has taken place – I personally know of no time or event and see the opposite reality reflected today

I’m not in harmony with these two assumptions and sense the need for us, the Body of Christ, to honestly reconsider our use of this term. We can start by recognizing our efforts are pushing for a reconciliation that has no direct point of conciliation. In doing so we’re playing the role of a blind person, searching in a dark room for a black fitted ball-cap that’s not there.

I’m not proposing we throw the term away immediately since its so widely used with honest intentions (in most cases). Trust me, this is not a ‘throw the baby out with the bath water‘ plea. However, going back to the illustration of a baby in bath water, I’m admitting I see a dirty baby sitting in filthy water. What I’m proposing is we;

  • drain the water
  • wash the tub
  • fill it with fresh water
  • give the baby a much needed bath

I’m calling us to gradually walk away from the term racial reconciliation and replace it with Ethnic Conciliation. The goal is to see a literal point of conciliation take place in the Body of Christ first, so we can serve as its model before the eyes of our nation.

Embracing “Ethnic Conciliation”
I believe our generation can be the generation to introduce Ethnic Conciliation to the American landscape. Ethnic, in the sense of people from every nation, tribe and tongue are invited to the conversation. Conciliation, in the sense of Conflicting parties working towards overcoming their animosity, distrust, and hostility in order to operate as one united entity. Allow me to define the three underlined terms:

  • Animosity – dislike that is put on display
  • Distrust – viewing people as suspects until proven innocent
  • Hostility – expressed or acted out hate

As the Body of Christ, I feel it’s our responsibility to work towards ethnic conciliation. Yet, in light of the ethnic tensions we have within the household of faith, I believe Ethnic Conciliation will only become evident when the members of the Body of Christ stop withholding the compassion of Christ from each other.

My Initial Introduction
Recently I was invited to share my thoughts regarding the Parable of the Good Samaritan and how it relates to the ethnic tensions we have our in nation and cities today. The event was held in St. Louis on Martin Luther King Day (1/19/2015).

I opened my talk with the fact, in our nation it seems the public is now comfortable with the “I Have a Dream” Dr. Martin Luther King Jr of 1963 and not the “My dream has become a nightmare” Dr. King of 1967. At the same time I unpacked the reality that my generation only knows of the nightmare Dr. King spoke of in his interview.

I want you to check out the 26 minute clip of me sharing my talk at the event, and at the same time, as the Body of Christ, consider my observation from the text and the urban context. I feel there’s so much more to be discussed and the conversation won’t move unless you become involved.

I plan on continuing my work through the “how to” strategy of Ethnic Conciliation. I feel this term actually provides us (the Body of Christ) with a tangible goal for our nation to see become reality. At the same time, I want to invite you to the conversation. I feel if this conversation is going to take root, it is in dire need of millions of more voices beyond just mine.

I pray that you’ll help me uncover blind spots I’ve yet to see and speak into those blind spots, so the Body of Christ can see our local churches become what I call, “Brochures of Heaven“.

 

YOU CAN VIEW THE VIDEO HERE —> click here to watch

 

The LOVE that Drives out HATE (1/19/2015)

The LOVE that Drives out HATE (1/19/2015)

Posted in Arts & Culture, Church Planting, Missions, My Sermons, Preaching, Theology, To My Generation, Uncategorized, Urban Apologetics
5 comments on “Ethnic Concilation
  1. Omar Fernandez says:

    This is excellent brother! I completely agree about the racial reconciliation term. Adjusting our terminology is going to help us understand the problems that need to be overcome within and outside of the body of Christ. The “Brochures of Heaven“ term is a great way to summarize what churches should strive for if their context allows. Plan to watch the video soon, then will forward this to my pastor. Keep at it sir!

  2. Jimmy says:

    D. A. Horton….. I really appreciate your blog. I have been there for years. I would add a couple of more points. Racial Reconciliation is an evangelical term with little relevance in people of color community lives. The language is not commonly used. Secondly, racial reconciliation is anachronistic. It is presumed that God has not been addressing these issues beforehand. It is very insulting to folks who committed their very lives in eclectic ways for years. Finally, I appreciate your willingness to create different language or terms, but this issues is very complex and it directly attempts to address the well being of people’s lives.

    • dahorton says:

      Thank you dearly for your input. I look forward to future dialogues and seeing how the conversation can expand while at the same time, shift the paradigm of our nation towards God’s heart, seeing each human restored to the dignity of being an image bearer. In addition, seeing the church function as the One New Man, as prescribed in Eph. 2. Lord bless you brother!

  3. Chloe says:

    This is excellent brother, I like your blog to know Adjusting our terminology is going to help us understand the problems that need to be overcome within and outside of the body of Christ. So I will pleased if u post more blog for us.

9 Pings/Trackbacks for "Ethnic Concilation"
  1. […] the question, why we, as believers, need to seek racial reconciliation (or as I prefer to say, Ethnic Conciliation) rather than how we live out the implications of the gospel. We’re busy loading our clips with […]

  2. […] the world refuses to hear from us because of our lack of ethnic conciliation within the Body of Christ. Now is the time for us to mobilize by talking, listening, confession, […]

  3. […] As I explore the pushback I’ve received in person (and online) regarding my talks on Ethnic Conciliation and why #BlackLivesMatter, it seems there is a fear I’m advocating ethnocentrism. Its like when I […]

  4. […] on these talks instead, we need holistically deal with our issues regarding ethnicity to the pointEthnic Conciliation is evident in our; denominational structures, higher academic institutions, conference line-ups, […]

  5. […] on these talks instead, we need holistically deal with our issues regarding ethnicity to the point Ethnic Conciliation is evident in our; denominational structures, higher academic institutions, conference line-ups, […]

  6. […] peacefully – demanding equality for all people. It will mean adding the work D.A Horton calls “ethnic conciliation” to that short list of justice issues that the church so loudly […]

  7. […] Ethnic Conciliation = Fourth, it is the Body of Christ’s responsibility to work towards ethnic conciliation in place of “racial reconciliation”. In light of the ethnic tensions we have within the […]

  8. […] Ethnic Conciliation = Fourth, it is the Body of Christ’s responsibility to work towards ethnic conciliation in place of “racial reconciliation”. In light of the ethnic tensions we have within the […]

  9. […] books & articles on ethnic conciliation (not racial reconciliation… because I think DA Horton is brilliant), & I’m trying desperately to unpack the responsibility of the church & […]

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